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  • Anthropology PhD Students Find Evidence of Early Human Eating an Entire Rattlesnake

    Two former students, Crystal Dozier and Elanor Sonderman, and one current student, Morgan Smith, analyzed a coprolite as part of a final project. This coprolite turned out to reveal more than expected.   The team found the snakes bones, scales, and fang in the coprolite. Further analysis revealed the fang may have belonged to a […]

  • Ancestry / Genealogy Icon with Family Tree Album Web Header Banner and Icon Set

    Department of Anthropology Symposium

      Pop-Culture Racism? Race, Identity, and the Dangers of Genetic Ancestry Testing   Friday, March 1st 9:30 am – 5 pm Texas A&M University Hotel and Conference Center The Ross Room Abstract for the Symposium Popular conceptions of race are deeply embedded in everyday life. For decades, anthropologists have argued that biological variations among different […]

  • Dr. Vaughn Bryant Selected As One Of 2017-2018 Regents Professor Award Recipients

      The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents recently awarded Dr. Vaughn Bryant, Professor of Anthropology, with the title of Regents Professor. Dr. Vaughn Byrant, Director of the Palynology Lab, was one of 15 recipients for this award for 2017-2018.  Dr. Bryant was the first faculty member to be hired to teach anthropology at […]

  • Lowering Alamo Cannon Into the Boil Vat

    Salute to the Alamo Conservation

    Texas A&M University’s Alamo cannon conservation project came to a historic conclusion Wednesday as the last of seven battle-used cannons were returned to the Alamo in a changing of the guard ceremony between living historians and members of the Texas A&M Corps of Cadets. During the “Texas A&M and The Alamo Present: A Salute to […]

  • Wooden Ship-Cart Model from the late 13th to early 12th century BC

    Egyptian Ship Model Sheds Light on Bronze Age Warfare and Religion

    Anthropology professor Shelley Wachsmann wrote a blog for the Getty Museum on the subject of one of his recent books: an ancient ship model from Egypt.

  • A Homo naledi skull, ‘Neo.’ Clockwise from upper left: three-quarter, frontal, superior and left lateral views. Scale bar – 5 cm. Image credit: Hawks et al, doi: 10.7554/eLife.24232.

    Faculty Makes List of Discover Magazine Top Stories for 2017

    A research team that included a Texas A&M University anthropologist who determined the fossil remains discovered last year in a South African cave almost certainly coexisted with early Homo sapiens has been named one of Discover magazine’s “Top 100 Stories for 2017.”

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