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Glasscock Internal Faculty Fellows 2018-2019

Recipients of the four annually awarded Internal Faculty Fellowships receive a one-course teaching release in the spring semester of the fellowship year, a $1,000 research bursary, and an office in the Glasscock Center for the fellowship year. These fellows, along with the Glasscock Faculty Research Fellows, will present and participate in the Faculty Colloquium Series during […]

Recipients of the four annually awarded Internal Faculty Fellowships receive a one-course teaching release in the spring semester of the fellowship year, a $1,000 research bursary, and an office in the Glasscock Center for the fellowship year. These fellows, along with the Glasscock Faculty Research Fellows, will present and participate in the Faculty Colloquium Series during their fellowship semester.

Academic Year 2019-2020

Stephen Daniel
Stephen Daniel is a Professor of Philosophy and University Professor for Teaching Excellence, and has taught at Texas A&M University for thirty-six years. His research, which focuses on 17th and 18th century philosophy and contemporary continental thought, has resulted in four books, sixty-two articles, and three edited volumes. His publications include work on George Berkeley, G. W. Leibniz, John Toland, Giambattista Vico, Rene Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, and Jonathan Edwards. He is past president of the International Berkeley Society and is currently editor of Berkeley Studies. For his Glasscock project, he will complete a book on how Berkeley’s thought relates to other early modern philosophers (including Hobbes, Arnauld, Malebranche, Spinoza, and Bayle).

 

Tasha Dubriwny
Tasha Dubriwny holds a joint appointment with Communication and Women’s and Gender Studies. Her research engages the intersection of feminism, politics, and health from a rhetorical perspective. Specifically, Dubriwny examines the articulation of identities for women in a broad range of contexts and demonstrates how these identities are informed by (and inform) changing rhetorical vocabularies and the rhetorical processes of social change. For her fellowship project, Dr. Dubriwny is tackling the question of how abortion rights advocates are rhetorically adapting to the legislative success of the anti-abortion movement by analyzing public moral arguments for abortion rights.

 

 

Richard J. Golsan

Bio forthcoming

 

 

 

Manuel Marchesini

Photo and bio forthcoming.


The Glasscock Center accepts applications for Glasscock Internal Faculty Residential Fellowships each spring semester. Applications will be accepted again in Spring 2020 for the 2020-2021 academic year. For further information visit our funding opportunities page or contact the Glasscock Center at glasscock@tamu.edu or (979) 845-8328.