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Glasscock Faculty Research Fellowship Recipients 2019-2020

Seven fellowships valued at $5,000 each were awarded for 2018-19. These fellowships are designed to address a need for funding for research that could not be accomplished otherwise in order to complete a book project, major article or series of articles, or other research project that makes an impact in the field.

Seven fellowships valued at $5,000 each were awarded for 2019-20. These fellowships are designed to address a need for funding for research that could not be accomplished otherwise in order to complete a book project, major article or series of articles, or other research project that makes an impact in the field. Money can be used for any travel, conference, archival/fieldwork, or other normally reimbursable expenses. Fellow participate in the Faculty Colloquium Series, which will function as a working group for these works-in-progress. Projects are chosen on the basis or their intellectual rigor, scholarly creativity, and potential to make a significant impact in the candidate’s career and field. Faculty in affiliated departments are eligible to apply.  

Academic Year 2019-2020

Adam Rosenthal

Adam R. Rosenthal is Assistant Professor of International Studies. His research interests include deconstruction, Romantic poetry, continental philosophy, and posthumanism. He has published articles on cloning, the work of Jacques Derrida, and the philosophy of Martin Heidegger, and is the co-editor of Oxford Literary Review 40.2. The topic of his fellowship project, "Poetics of the Gift," analyzes Romantic-era representations of poetry as gift. Focusing on the writings of Wordsworth, Shelley, Thoreau, and Baudelaire, it shows how these authors reinterpreted traditional Western figures of inspiration, genius, imagination, and patronage.

Reyko Huang
Reyko Huang is an associate professor at the Bush School of Government & Public Service. Her research examines armed conflict and international politics, with a focus on rebel organizations and their strategies of governance and diplomacy. The fellowship supports her new project on rebel leaders and their transnational social networks, which aims to demonstrate the material, social, and ideological connections across armed groups and their implications for conflict dynamics and outcomes. Huang is the author of The Wartime Origins of Democratization: Civil War, Rebel Governance, and Political Regimes (Cambridge University Press, 2016). She holds a Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University.
 
Melanie Hawthorne
Melanie Hawthorne is Professor of French in the Department of International Studies. Her work on French women writers 1850-1950 has led to an award-winning biography of the decadent writer Rachilde, an edited volume on Simone de Beauvoir, and most recently (2013), The Woman Who Didn't Exist, a defense of humanities through the recovery of a lost figure of the decadent period (Gisèle d'Estoc). Hawthorne's current projects focus on the Anglo-French fin-de-siècle writer Renée Vivien (Pauline Tarn, 1877-1909). In addition to preparing an edition of Vivien's short fiction, Hawthorne is working on an alternative biographical genre, a visual account of Vivien's life.
 

Chaitanya Lakkimsetti
Dr. Chaitanya Lakkimsetti is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Women’s and Gender Studies. Her areas of interest and expertise include sexualities, gender, law & society and South Asia. She is the author of Legalizing Sex: Sexual Minorities, AIDS and Citizenship in India (Forthcoming, NYU press). Her work also appeared in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, Sexualities, positions: asia critique and Qualitative Sociology. The fellowship supports her new project on LGBTQ social movements in India.

 
 
Diego Von Vacano
Bio forthcoming.