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Glasscock Affiliated Fellows 2019-2020

Affiliated Fellows John Gruesser CHCI-ACLS Visiting Fellow Dr. John Gruesser is a Senior Research Scholar in English at Sam Houston State University. He is working on an ACLS-funded project, Man on the Firing Line: The Literary Life of Sutton E. Griggs, 1872-1933. Man on the Firing Line challenges current notions about the audience for, and […]

Affiliated Fellows

John Gruesser
CHCI-ACLS Visiting Fellow

John GruesserDr. John Gruesser is a Senior Research Scholar in English at Sam Houston State University. He is working on an ACLS-funded project, Man on the Firing Line: The Literary Life of Sutton E. Griggs, 1872-1933.
Man on the Firing Line challenges current notions about the audience for, and the content, production, and dissemination of, politically engaged US black fiction. The project contributes to the critical reassessment not only of Sutton Griggs, but also of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century African American and US literary, print, and religious culture. This grant will support research in key places connected to Griggs, including Dallas, Nashville, Memphis, Philadelphia, and Chicago.

Bryce Henson
Assistant Visiting Professor, Communication
Bryce Henson is an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Fellow and a Visiting Assistant Professor of Media, Culture, and Identity in the Department of Communication at Texas A&M University. He received his PhD from the Institute of Communications Research with graduate certification in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. His research interests are cultural studies, Africana studies, media studies, diaspora theory, Black feminism, Caribbean theory, postcolonialism, and critical ethnography. His scholarship analyzes how Black diasporic cultures are mediated between representation and experience, particularly in the non-Anglophone Global South. He is a co-editor for the forthcoming book New Spaces of Colonialism: Reading Cities, Schools, and Museums in the Tumult of Globalization (Peter Lang) and also working on his solo book manuscript titled Diasporic Fugitives: Race, Gender, and Brazilian Hip-Hop Cultures. Also, he is an Executive Board Member for the Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora (ASWAD).

Sergio Lemus
Assistant Visiting Professor, Anthropology
Sergio Lemus is a cultural anthropologist whose research interests include theories of race, materiality, the body, Mexican migration, border analysis, Latinx cancer, biopolitics, and class relations. Dr. Lemus' current research project involves documenting the centrality of labor in driving cultural transformations in a new land as well as the politico-historical transformation that give rise to a new working class formation—los yarderos. This research is slated to be published as a book at the University of Illinois Press under the series Latinos in Chicago and the Midwest under the title, “Los Yarderos: Mexican Yard Workers in Neoliberal Chicago.”

 

Portia Owusu
Assistant Visiting Professor, English
Dr Portia Owusu is a Visiting Assistant Professor / ACES Fellow of English in the Department of English at Texas A&M University. She was born in Ghana and grew up in London, England, where she completed her PhD in West African and African-American literature at SOAS, the University of London. Her work examine contemporary American and West African literature. Of particular interest are slavery; historical trauma and memory; diaspora and cultural philosophies. Her current project is a monograph on history, memory and slavery in West African and African-American narratives

 

Emilce Santana
Assistant Visiting Professor, Sociology

Dr. Emilce Santana is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Fellow. Her research interests include race/ethnicity, social stratification, and immigrant integration. Dr. Santana has published an article in The Sociological Quarterly on the role of skin color and acculturation on perceived discrimination among Latinos and is currently working on a series of papers that explore patterns and determinants of interethnic and interracial relationships. She has a doctorate in Sociology with a specialization in Population Studies from Princeton University.