Skip to main content

April Hatfield

April Hatfield
Associate Professor
Areas of Speciality
  • Atlantic World
  • Early America
  • Caribbean
  • Early Southern
Contact
  • (979) 845-7180
  • ahatfield@tamu.edu
  • Glasscock 209A
Professional Links
Education
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 1998

Research Interests

April Hatfield received her Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University in 1997 and began teaching at Texas A&M the following year.  Her work examines how borders and migration shaped individuals and institutions in the early modern Atlantic world.  Her publications include several book chapters and articles and the monograph Atlantic Virginia: Intercolonial Relations in the Seventeenth Century (2004).  Her current project “Creole Allegiances” follows a variety of individuals as they negotiated the borders of English and Spanish imperial spaces in the western Caribbean and southeastern North America in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

Publications

Atlantic Virginia: Intercolonial Relations in the Seventeenth Century Atlantic Virginia: Intercolonial Relations in the Seventeenth Century

Through networks of trails and rivers inland and established ocean routes across the seas, seventeenth-century Virginians were connected to a vibrant Atlantic world. They routinely traded with adjacent Native Americans and received ships from England, the Netherlands, and other English and Dutch colonies, while maintaining less direct connections to Africa and to French and Spanish colonies. Their Atlantic world emerged from the movement of goods and services, but trade routes quickly became equally important in the transfer of people and information.