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Message from the Director

Message from the Director

Fall 2021

The Fall semester is underway, and at the Glasscock Center we have been continuing the vital work of supporting faculty and student humanities research through our grant opportunities, weekly colloquia series for our Glasscock Fellows, Undergraduate Summer Scholars program, working groups, and Global Health Humanities and Humanities: Land Sea Space initiatives. 

During the summer, we welcomed Glasscock’s first group of Summer Research Fellows. These new fellowships were introduced to support faculty and graduate research from within the Texas A&M community as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to impede research activities. Each fellowship is entitled to a faculty member to fund a graduate student research position during the three summer months. We plan to continue this grant program for next summer, too. Check our website for details about upcoming presentations from our summer fellows about their projects. 

Our Undergraduate Summer Scholars presentations took place on August 31, under the overall theme of “Gender, Power Structures, and Social Change.” This fantastic set of student research projects are led by three faculty directors in the departments of International Studies, Philosophy, and Sociology. 

In September, we were delighted to announce the winner of the Twenty-Second Annual Susanne M. Glasscock Humanities Book Prize for Interdisciplinary Scholarship, Nicole R. Fleetwood, for her book Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration (Harvard University Press, 2020). Dr. Fleetwood is a writer, curator, and the inaugural James Weldon Johnson Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University. We are very much looking forward to Dr. Fleetwood’s virtual visit to Texas A&M in early March 2022 to receive the prize, deliver the prize lecture, and discuss Marking Time with the campus and wider community. 

The first Buttrill event of the year, organized by our Buttrill Ethics grant recipient, Dr. Carlee Purdum, took place in hybrid format in Rudder and Rudder Plaza. “Can’t Beat the Heat: Extreme Temperatures and the Lack of Air-Conditioning in Texas Prisons,” featured a panel discussion with Dr. Purdum (Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center), Dr. Amite Dominic (Texas Prisons Community Advocates), and Zulema Alvarez (Breaking Chains & Staying Connected), and a mock cell and poster exhibit. The Carrol O. Buttrill ’38 Endowed Fund for Ethics promotes on-going investigations into ethical questions of significance to the Texas A&M community.

Through our two initiatives, which promote new directions of research in the humanities, we have a series of events planned for the fall and a conference to follow in the spring. Humanities: Land Sea Space is hosting a series on Plants, People, and the Humanities, with the first event in TAMU’s Teaching Gardens on October 21, and the second event, a webinar, on November 5. This series will be accompanied by a virtual discussion group focused on Robin Wall Kimmerer’s books, Braiding Sweetgrass and Gathering Moss. Global Health Humanities will be hosting a Brown Bag Lunch series, with invited speakers on the question, “How has the pandemic affected how you think about your humanities research?” Check our website as more details become available.  The spring conference, which is scheduled to take place on April 1, 2022, will feature work at the intersection of the health and environmental humanities to address the topic of “Planetary Health and the Humanities.” 

Thanks to the generosity of Melbern and Susanne Glasscock and the commitment of Texas A&M faculty, students, and staff, we continue our work in supporting the university community in flexible and safe ways during the ongoing pandemic. All of us at the Glasscock Center send our best wishes for a safe and rewarding semester.

Emily Brady
Susanne M. and Melbern G. Glasscock Director and Chair
Professor of Philosophy


Past messages

Spring 2021

On behalf of the Glasscock Center team, I would like to send along our concern and well wishes to all affected by the awful winter storm in Texas last week and subsequent power outages and water problems. We hope that everyone is staying safe.

These tumultuous times bring to the fore the importance of shared humanity across communities and more widely across societies and cultures. Our major upcoming events speak to this virtue of interconnectedness in the context of current events. On March 1, a half-day webinar symposium, “The Long-Term Impacts of Pandemics: Ongoing Disruptions to Society, Families, and the Economy,” will focus on various disruptions to individuals, society, and economies during and after epidemics. Panels will incorporate the perspectives of those with first-hand experience of epidemics, as well as humanities scholars and healthcare practitioners. We are collaborating with the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs at The Bush School of Government and Public Service to present this event.  

On March 3, we are delighted to welcome the winner of the 21st Annual Susanne M. Glasscock Humanities Book Prize for Interdisciplinary Scholarship, Professor Susan Neiman, for a short webinar presentation and Q&A about Learning From the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil. In her deeply topical and engaging book, Professor Neiman draws upon philosophical reflection, personal stories, and interviews with both Americans and Germans to explore how they are grappling with the evils of their own national histories. 

This month, we are holding our annual (virtual) Glasscock Humanities Festival, which draws together a set of our key events. The festival kicked off with the opening of our virtual exhibition of the awarded COVID-19 Micro-grant projects: arts and humanities-based works engaging lived experiences of the pandemic. We encourage you to view these amazing projects. We have also been enjoying discussions at our weekly Glasscock Fellows’ colloquia, which continue on Zoom throughout the semester. Please join us for these events, as well as our upcoming book chats! Finally, we are excited to launch a new part of our website which provides information, news, and events relating to our developing Public Humanities initiative.

Thanks to the generosity of Melbern and Susanne Glasscock and the commitment of Texas A&M faculty, students, and staff, we continue our work in supporting the university community in flexible, creative, and safe ways during the ongoing pandemic. All of us at the Glasscock Center send our best wishes for a smooth and rewarding semester.

Emily Brady
Susanne M. and Melbern G. Glasscock Director and Chair
Professor of Philosophy


Fall 2020

As we begin this new semester, I hope that this message finds you all well. During these difficult times, the work of humanities centers is more important than ever. Humanistic perspectives embody the openness, imagination, critical thought, and generosity which good and just citizenship requires. The generous commitment of our faculty, students, and staff enables the Glasscock Center to fulfill our vital mission of promoting and fostering humanities research at Texas A&M and beyond. In 2020-2021, we continue our work of supporting the university community in flexible, creative, and safe ways.

We have an exciting calendar of virtual events planned for the semester, including our weekly faculty fellows’ colloquia and graduate fellows colloquia, Undergraduate Summer Scholars presentations, and events presented by our two initiatives. Global Health Humanities will be focusing on “Frontline worker’s stories during Covid-19.” Speakers will address such topics as training challenges in the health professions, emotional and physical burnout, and priorities in patient care during a time of crisis. The series will explore the role of sharing and listening to stories in understanding these issues. Humanities: Land Sea Space, in partnership with Texas A&M’s Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center, will present events on the theme of “Coastal Communities and Justice,” concerning environmental justice, energy, community, and forms of resilience in coastal areas in Texas and beyond. The series begins with a screening of the award-winning film, Seadrift, and Q&A with the director, Tim Tsai. This year, Humanities: Land Sea Space is delighted to be partnering with Rice University’s Center for Environmental Studies. Check our website for details about their series of virtual talks on sustainable design, Green New Deals, and ecologies of the global south. We also continue our Glasscock Book Chats series and will be featuring Chaitanya Lakkimsetti’s book, Legalizing Sex: Sexual Minorities, AIDS and Citizenship in India, with a response by Vanita Reddy to kick off our discussion.

Although we will miss the opportunity for in-person conversation and exchange of ideas this autumn, please do join us for our virtual events. We encourage you to explore our website for new information and updates about our activities, grants, and programs. 

All of us at the Glasscock Center wish you a safe and rewarding semester. 

 

Emily Brady
Susanne M. and Melbern G. Glasscock Director and Chair
Professor of Philosophy


April 2020

The Glasscock Center team extends their concern and support to everyone affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. We hope that you are well and safe.

In these extraordinary times, I have been struck by the tremendous response of the arts and humanities in providing much needed cultural support. Museums are offering virtual exhibitionstheatrical productions are streaming online and via social media, film festivals have become virtual, and the arts are striving to be more accessible in myriad ways. Teaching online is currently the norm, and libraries are making their collections more widely available to serve a range of needs. Humanities scholars, and many others from various disciplines, are responding imaginatively and critically to the unprecedented ways in which the pandemic has changed daily lives across the planet.

The Glasscock Center is developing ways to contribute, too. We continue our important mission of awarding grants and supporting faculty and student research, with necessary adjustments through digital and other means. Our colloquia series has been continuing online. The Global Health Humanities and Humanities: Land Sea Space initiatives have been active: check out the blog Health Humanities during COVID-19 and the upcoming discussion group on “Covid-19 and the Environment.” We are excited to announce a new, responsive grant, “Micro-Grants in the Arts and Humanities,” which is intended to encourage the documentation and creative interpretation of people’s experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. We encourage and welcome your participation in all of these activities!

The Glasscock Center will continue to work productively to find ways to be flexible, creative, and safe in line with our mission and these changing times.

Take care and best wishes,

Emily Brady
Susanne M. and Melbern G. Glasscock Director and Chair
Professor of Philosophy


Spring 2020

Our semester is well underway here at the Glasscock Center, with activities ranging from our weekly faculty and graduate colloquia, working group activities, and book chats, to our own major events and those which we support and co-sponsor through a range of grants.

We have been busy organizing the celebration of our 20th Annual Susanne M. Glasscock Humanities Book Prize for Interdisciplinary Scholarship, which has been awarded to Louis Hyman (Cornell). His book, Temp: How American Work, American Business, and the American Dream Became Temporary, is the untold history of the surprising origins of the “gig economy.” The book was named a “Triumph” of 2018 by The New York Times book critics, is the winner of the William G. Bowen Prize, and has been shortlisted for the 800-CEO-READ Business Book Award. The New York Times writes that Temp is “Illuminating and often surprising…a book that encourages us to imagine a future that is inclusive and humane rather than sentimentalize a past that never truly was.” Please join us for a community event at 6:30pm on Wednesday, March 4th in the George Bush Presidential Library, and the award presentation and lecture at 4pm on Thursday, March 5th in our own Glasscock Library (Room 311).

Our two initiatives, Global Health Humanities (GHH) and Humanities: Land Sea Space (HLSS), which reflect pressing global issues and novel cross-disciplinary research, have been gaining strong momentum through various research activities and building new partnerships. Colonial Psychiatry and its Aftereffects will take place on April 1st and is co-sponsored with the History Department. This forum engages the practices and concepts associated with colonial psychiatry and their ongoing effects upon global health. Coastal Communities and Justice, a symposium to be held on April 23rd, will explore questions concerning environmental justice, community, and forms of resilience in coastal places in Texas and beyond. This event is co-sponsored with the Hazard Reduction & Recovery Center at Texas A&M. We are very excited to be screening the documentary film, Seadrift (Tim Tsai, 2019) as part of the symposium. The film tells the story of tragic events which took place in the Seadrift, Texas fishing community in 1979 and their aftermath. Seadrift has been featured at numerous film festivals, including Slamdance, where it was nominated for a Grand Jury Prize. As always, our Glasscock events are free and open to all!

The Glasscock Center recently welcomed two graduate research assistants to the team, Shannon Gonzenbach (English) and Victoria Green (Philosophy). They are assisting us with our two initiatives, as well as making progress on researching and developing new GCHR projects related to the public humanities. We’re delighted to have them on board!

We hope that you enjoy the rest of the semester, and we look forward to welcoming you to our colloquia and upcoming spring events! Check them out on our web calendar for more information.

Emily Brady
Susanne M. and Melbern G. Glasscock Director and Chair
Professor of Philosophy