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The Humanities and COVID-19

Updated 6/26/20. The Glasscock Center team continues to serve and support the humanities and our Center community remotely during the current situation. Should you need to get in touch with us, please email glasscock@tamu.edu.

6/26/20 Update:

The Glasscock Center has launched a new funding opportunity: the Virtual Co-Sponsorship Class Lecture grant.

As travel plans remain uncertain, visits to campus by guest lecturers are happening virtually. In an effort to support courses in the humanities and humanistic social sciences, the Glasscock Center is facilitating bringing the expertise and resources of scholars outside of TAMU to the virtual classroom with a new, responsive grant.

To learn more, and to submit your application, click here.


5/27/20 Update:

The Glasscock Center has launched a new funding opportunity: the Glasscock Online Writing Groups grant.

As faculty and students navigate their work on research projects amid continued instability from the pandemic situation, it’s important to facilitate the creation of routine and to establish patterns. Virtual writing communities offer a valuable opportunity to immerse oneself in academic inquiry.

To learn more, and to submit your application, click here.


5/19/20 Update:

COVID-19 Micro-Grants in the Arts & Humanities

Submissions for the grant are closed. We have awarded 11 projects. Keep an eye out for news about outputs from these projects.
Check our website soon for a new funding opportunity.


4/20/20 Update:

Check out the blog, “Health Humanities during COVID-19,” presented by our Global Health Humanities initiative.

The Health Humanities is the study of the intersection of health and humanistic disciplines (such as philosophy, religion, literature), fine arts, as well as social science research that gives insight to the human condition (such as history, anthropology, sociology, and cultural studies.) (*Adapted from the National Library of Medicine’s definition for Medical Humanities).

The unfolding human suffering caused by the current COVID-19 pandemic invites those who study Health Humanities to contribute to discussions with health scientists, social services providers, and political leaders, about the role of the Humanities in a time of crisis. Undergraduate students enrolled in the senior capstone Health Humanities seminar at Texas A&M were tasked with addressing the question “what does the study of Health Humanities contribute to the current discussion of the coronavirus crisis?” Replies are anonymized and reproduced with permission.


4/20/20 Update:

Message from the Director

The Glasscock Center team extends their concern and support to everyone affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. We hope that you are well and safe.

In these extraordinary times, I have been struck by the tremendous response of the arts and humanities in providing much needed cultural support. Museums are offering virtual exhibitionstheatrical productions are streaming online and via social media, film festivals have become virtual, and the arts are striving to be more accessible in myriad ways. Teaching online is currently the norm, and libraries are making their collections more widely available to serve a range of needs. Humanities scholars, and many others from various disciplines, are responding imaginatively and critically to the unprecedented ways in which the pandemic has changed daily lives across the planet.

The Glasscock Center is developing ways to contribute, too. We continue our important mission of awarding grants and supporting faculty and student research, with necessary adjustments through digital and other means. Our colloquia series has been continuing online. The Global Health Humanities and Humanities: Land Sea Space initiatives have been active: check out the blog Health Humanities during COVID-19 and the upcoming discussion group on “Covid-19 and the Environment.” We are excited to announce a new, responsive grant, “Micro-Grants in the Arts and Humanities,” which is intended to encourage the documentation and creative interpretation of people’s experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. We encourage and welcome your participation in all of these activities!

The Glasscock Center will continue to work productively to find ways to be flexible, creative, and safe in line with our mission and these changing times.

Take care and best wishes,

Emily Brady
Susanne M. and Melbern G. Glasscock Director and Chair
Professor of Philosophy


4/17/20 Update:

The Glasscock Center announces COVID-19 Micro-Grants in the Arts and Humanities

The Glasscock Center invites proposals for a micro-grant program meant to encourage the documentation and creative interpretation of people’s experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. Up to ten $500 micro-grants will be awarded, and applications will be open on a rolling basis. Any Texas A&M University student, faculty or staff member is eligible to apply for this grant.
To learn more and submit your proposal, click here.


4/13/20 Update:

HLSS Discussion Group on COVID-19 and the Environment

Earth Day, Wednesday, April 22, 2020
4:00-5:00 pm (CST), via Zoom

Click here for more information.


3/20/20 Update:

The Glasscock Center team continues to serve and support the humanities and our Center community remotely during the current situation. Should you need to get in touch with us, please email glasscock@tamu.edu.